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Light and sound therapy for Alzheimer’s may also prevent ‘chemo brain’

An experimental Alzheimer’s treatment involving sounds and flickering lights also prevented a decline in mental sharpness among mice having chemotherapy

An experimental treatment for Alzheimer’s disease that involves flickering lights and low-pitched sound may also help prevent cognitive problems after cancer treatment, sometimes called chemo brain, a study in mice suggests.

For Alzheimer’s disease, the light and sound stimulation has been shown to ease memory and concentration problems in small trials in people, but it is still being investigated in larger studies.

The lights flicker 40 times a second, or 40 hertz, with the sound also having a frequency of 40 Hz. This frequency was originally selected because people with Alzheimer’s have a lower intensity of 40 Hz brainwaves, which are linked with memory processing. The idea was that the treatment would stimulate these brainwaves.

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